The official Russell Hoban website

Welcome to russellhoban.org, providing definitive information and the latest news about the late novelist Russell Hoban and his work.

On 11-13 February 2005 the Russell Hoban community convened in London in a unique celebration of the author's 80th birthday and an amazing body of work, from the Frances books through The Mouse and His Child to Riddley Walker and his then-new novel Come Dance With Me. Accompanying the convention was a superb 50-page booklet containing tributes from friends, associates and fans, including Quentin Blake (above), Glenda Jackson and novelist David Mitchell. Now the full booklet is published online for the first time. Read the Russell Hoban Some-Poasyum Booklet here

Latest news

Steven Claydon, Martin Clark and Graham Harman

Curators of "The Noing Uv It" exhibition partly inspired by Riddley Walker discuss the philosophical and artistic themes behind the show.

Norway museum to exhibit "The Noing Uv It" inspired by Russell Hoban's novel, featuring work by over 30 international artists

Rosie's Magic Horse on stage

Photoset from the new stage adaptation of Russell Hoban's final children's book

Selected Russell Hoban quotation

Winter is always either just ahead or just behind.

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Sample site content

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Touching summary of Russell Hoban's life and work.
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Writer Meg Sanders writes about how she discovered The Mouse and His Child, and looks at some of its themes and influences.
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Essay by author/journalist Andrew Brown, mostly about Richard Dawkins, touching on Riddley Walker.
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Edition
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Article by Johnny Herbert on the Kunstforum website tackling the exhibits and ideas in "The Noing Uv It", an exhibition at Bergen Kunsthall partly inspired by Riddley Walker, whose aim is to "invite us to think about objects".
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On a black and stormy night the sea-thing child is flung up on the beach, a little draggled heap of scales and feathers. Although made for deep diving and high flying, he is afraid of the ocean. When he meets a fiddler crab with no bow, these two help each other avoid their fears for a while.

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No one realizes that the poor marzipan pig has fallen behind the sofa. No one hears his lonely cries for help. His sweetness grows bitter over the months that go by until a mouse discovers him and gobbles him up.

Essay

Chris Bell considers an under-appreciated period in Russell Hoban's life and career - that of professional painter and illustrator. Contains several examples of his work.

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Harry Phillips writes briefly for the March 18, 1957 issue of Sports Illustrated on Russell Hoban's Floyd Patterson article and illustrations for the same issue; that article can be found at http://www.si.com/vault/1957/03/18/601037/an-artist-looks-at-his-subject This is also referred to in Chr
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James Parker puts an eloquent case for making Riddley Walker into a film in this New York Times opinion piece.
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Jonathan Fitch was shocked by Mr Rinyo-Clacton's offer of a million pounds and one year to live, but what happened next was even more shocking.

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In this 1987 audio interview with Don Swaim, Russell Hoban discusses The Medusa Frequency, which is an "Orphus Uridisy" retelling. He reflects on growing up in Pennsylvania, and his continuous love for reading and art.
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Phil Ockerman falls hard for Bertha Strunk at a tango lesson in a church crypt in Clerkenwell. Bertha also bears a strong resemblance to the 17th century Venetian singer and composer Barbara Strozzi, with whom Phil happens to be obsessed, to the point where Phil is no longer sure which is which.

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